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Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
can come up with. >> we need to bring it back into balance. >> molly, you covered washington. this is the fundmental issue we are talking about. it's an ase metric polarization. it's a political science. impeer cal way of trying to track where people are and where the caucuses are. the originator of this scoring system ran the new numbers. the 112th senate is on top and the 113th senate is on the bottom. there's not that nuch difference. both peaks narrowed. they cluster more around their caucuses. can the senate function under its current conditions of polarization on one hand and super majority on the other? >> not so far, right. in the last couple years, they haven't gotten a lot done. i think this argument about, you know, status quo versus a mandate for if not change something. it's interesting. it's like the republicans are making this argument that there was a mandate to do nothing because they do not want to see liberals take the ball and run with it. and accomplish a lot of their policy proposals or ideas. so -- but i think you see wiggle room. you do -- i mean every
and the community in washington faced for at least a decade. the consensus voice as thunder in force. it's vital security interest to have an agreement between israel and the palestinians. but, it says, after a semicolon, we cannot want that more than the parties themselves. this is an ox y moron. we have to decide which part of that sentence is not true. where have we been kidding ourselves? is this a vital interest of the united states? in which case, we have to want it more and throw our weight behind it and tailor or policies behind it with less deference. >> what does that mean? in a con credit sense, what does it look like? >> not letting the israelis drag us into overreacting to palestinian diplomatic moves at the u.n. it means understanding that we have a choice here. the palestinians are facing a choice between the p.a. and the plo. their strategy of negotiations and diplomacy versus hamas' with arm struggle and confrontation. we, the israelis play a huge goal in how that goes. one of the reasons hamas is able to spin this into a huge victory, unlike last time, like in 2008 and 2009, is
that is both, in washington, on capitol hill, but also in the media. the media, the beltway i think has bought into this idea that deficits are the primary conversation we should be having. but if you look at it as a historic matter, you know, what did fdr do wrong after injecting a huge amount of stimulus in to the economy he gave into the temptation to attack deficits than he did austerity which plunged the country back into a recession. what did europe do wrong? they responded to this huge economic crisis with austerity and in the case of great britain they went into a double-dip recession. their economy is flat-lined because of austerity. so, you know, president obama has a great opportunity to not make the mistakes of history and not make the mistakes of europe. austerity doesn't work. the other issues and we talk about that budget fight, what you're saying accurately that after 2010, we're going to try austerity, we're going to do what the republicans want, which is cuts, we found out how difficult it is to find things to shave off the budget. there are only a few things to cut. there's
policy community or the consensus of the policy community in washington has faced for at least a decade. the consensus voice has thundered forth. vital national security interest, to have a two-state peace agreement between the israelis and the palestinians, but it says we cannot want that more than the parties themselves. this isyoxymoron. this is an absurdity. this is a vital national security interest that iran doesn't have nuclear wps weapons, but we can't want that more than anybody else. is this really a vital interest of the united states. in which case we have to throw our weight behind it and tailor our policies around it with less deference to domestic -- >> what does that mean? in a concrete sense what does it look like? >> in a concrete sense, it means not letting the israelis drag us into overreacting to palestinian diplomatic moves at the u.n. it means understanding that we have a choice here that the palestinians are facing a choice between the p.a. and the plo. their leadership in ramallah. and their strategy, versus hamas's strategy of arms struggle and we and the israe
's solve this. >>> i want to read you a headline from "the washington post," october 18th. cia lobbying to expand the drone fleet. officials say the proposal by david petraeus would bolster the strikes in pakistan and yemen. the cia is shifting in quite a remarkable way. i think it's undercovered. how important do you think this move to a para military is for the agency and the future? >> i mean it's extremely important. petraeus' affair, for all the privacy issues make people talk about the war in afghanistan and also what's happening with the cia. it didn't start with petraeus. the military started a lot of years ago. the 9/11 commission report came out in 2004 saying the cia needed to get their act together and conduct paramilitary operations in a way they haven't done before. >> the history of the agencies involved in these tends to be between the extremes between collecting and analyzing intelligence and operations. it seems like you are always asking the cia to do several impossible things. one is the untraceable operations that max mally impact the foreign policy or you are askin
to april 15th because that's when lincoln leaves washington for the longest time that he was out of washington during the entire war and went down to city point, grant's headquarters on the james river and then was present, basically, for the fall of petersburg and then the conquest of richmond, the capture of richmond and then famously went to richmond with his son and walked through the streets of the city the day after the city had fallen. and it was all very dramatic and very cinematic and i was certain that was going to be what attracted steven the most. but when i sent him this massive sort of phone book-sized script, it was the january stuff he immediately glomed on to. >> it's this amazing kind of hand-to-hand combat just to get enough votes to pass this. >> yeah. >> what did you learn about lincoln in writing this? because i think one of the things i think is great about him, he sort of captures lincoln's essential weirdness. >> right. >> it's this thing that comes up time and time again that you never quite see really nailed. he's such an odd figure. what else do you fe
. evan, your group is involved in maine, minnesota, maryland and washington. >> washington state. >> right. you have to raise a lot of money for these. this is not a grass roots -- i mean it's grass roots at a certain level but running a big campai campaign. >> it is grass roots. the reason we may succeed this year is because we have been knocking on doors, having conversations with neighbors. not just in the political moment but over years. it's persuasion over time that's helped people change their hearts and minds on the freedom to marry. to run a political campaign with the air wave war you have to wage. it does cost millions and millions of dollars. freedom to marry had to raise millions of dollars to channel into the states just to enable them to continue making the case to voters. >> i think you have to make an important point. ballot initiatives or not, what's going on is sustained citizen action. mobilization and that sort of thing. i think there's not enough of that. that is how you fight back. this is taking the form of ballot initiatives referendums. you can make head
and the washington, d.c. the economic losses are nearing $50 billion. flooding of new york subways and commuter train tunnels and loss of business accounts for much of that estimate. with an election just a few days away the political media industrial complex briefly ground to a halt and then somewhat awkwardly cranked back to life with mitt romney turning a campaign event into a relief rally. president obama heading back out on the trail and pundits growing more and more comfortable speculating consequences of the disaster. local and area officials had to make practical decisions and give emergency briefings and address the anxiety of their constituents. governor chris christie seemed to suggest he wasn't taking the election into consideration. >> is there any possibility that governor romney may go to new jersey to tour some of the damage with you? >> i have no idea. nor am i the least bit concerned or interested. >> right. >> i've got a job to do here in new jersey that's much bigger than presidential politics and i could care less about any of that stuff. the president was great last night. he sa
legalized marijuana. maine, washington and maryland legalized gay marriage. the 113th congress will include the most female members ever and for the first time in history, women and minorities will hold a majority of the democratic party's house seats. in his victory speech president obama vowed to continue the work he began in his first term. >> america, i believe we can build on the progress we've made and continue to fight for new jobs and new opportunity and new security for the middle class. i believe we can keep the promise of our founders. the idea that if you're willing to work hard, it doesn't matter who you are or where you come from or what you look like or where you love, it doesn't matter whether you're black or white or hispanic or asian ornatetive american or young or old or rich or poor, able, disabled, gay or straight, you can make it here in america if you're willing to try. >> the president's second term will no doubt be fraught with much of the same obstruction and frustration of the past four years, but after tuesday obama will have the opportunity to become one of the
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)